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Al Lane on his way to Washington, D.C. with Goshen's VFW Post in 2009. Lane was part of the 29th division who made the first landing on Omaha Beach. He was the only man in his company to survive.

Al Lane on his way to Washington, D.C. with Goshen’s VFW Post in 2009. Lane was part of the 29th division who made the first landing on Omaha Beach. He was the only man in his company to survive.

It’s D-Day, June 6, 1944 and Elkhart’s Dr. Warren Breniman was in France on Omaha Beach. He was part of Company A, 149th Engineering Combat Battalion, which was the second division to land on Omaha Beach.

The soldiers who made the first landing, the 29th division,  were nearly all killed. Goshen resident, Al Lane, a member of the 29th division, was the only one in his company to survive.

Front page of Rochester, N.Y. newspaper on June 6, 1944. The newspaper belonged to Marion Lane.

Front page of Rochester, N.Y. newspaper on June 6, 1944. The newspaper belonged to Marion Lane.

The supreme commander General Dwight D. Eisenhower called the invasion “a great crusade” and warned the troops that they were facing a well prepared enemy. The 149th division’s job was to do what the first group could not…take the beach. So they fought as infantry, they removed mines from the beach, they took care of the dead, they built a road and then they moved north through France, fighting along the way. Warren Breniman and the 149th received a Presidential Citation for their service in France.

In 2011, Larry App from Bristol interviewed Dr. Warren Breniman as part of his D-Day Landing on Omaha Beach video. Dr. Breniman died February 29, 2012. He had been director of education for the Elkhart Community Schools and was University Supervisor at IUSB for 25 years.

Dr. Warren Breniman shares his D-Day story in this video interview.
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